Patient Education

Med Diagnostic Rehab would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with me. I will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

I welcome you to my practice and look forward to caring for you.

Med Diagnostic Rehab provides a full range of medical services including the following:


Physical Therapy for Arthritis

Arthritis causes joint pain, stiffness and swelling. Osteoarthritis is a common type of arthritis that develops when cartilage in a joint wears down; another type is rheumatoid arthritis, which causes inflammation in the lining of a joint. Both types cause pain, tenderness and swelling, and can end up limiting a joint's movement. Over time, joints affected by arthritis can become severely damaged. Arthritis tends to affect older people, although athletes sometimes develop it from overuse or injury. ...


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Rehabilitation for Burn Injuries

After sustaining severe burn injuries, a patient usually needs skin grafts. However, grafted tissue can become very tight, severely restricting range of motion. During recovery, a rehabilitation program can help the patient to regain the endurance, strength and balance needed to perform everyday activities. ...


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Range-of-Motion Exercises

Range-of-motion exercises are prescribed to improve joint function after an injury or surgical procedure, or as ongoing treatment for chronic osteoarthritis or other disease. Their goal is to keep a patient flexible by gently increasing the range of joint and muscle movement, and decreasing pain, swelling and stiffness. ...


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Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy

Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is a method used to treat musculoskeletal conditions such as tennis elbow, Achilles tendonitis, plantar fasciitis and heel spurs. ESWT uses high-energy shockwave impulses to stimulate the healing process in damaged tendon tissue. These impulses are targeted directly at the area that is causing pain. ESWT is often used as a treatment for patients with chronic pain who do not want to undergo surgery. ...


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Hydrotherapy

Hydrotherapy (aquatic therapy) is a form of physical rehabilitation that uses the properties of water to help promote healing of several different conditions. Because of its natural properties, water can provide relief from the pain associated with orthopedic disorders such as arthritis, chronic back pain and bone fractures; neuromuscular diseases such as muscular dystrophy; and muscular conditions such as fibromyalgia. ...


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Active Release Technique Treatment

Active Release Technique (ART) treatment is a soft-tissue technique that treats conditions related to muscles, tendons, ligaments and nerves. This technique is often used on muscles that may be overused from athletic activity or on patients who may be suffering from pain caused by pulls, tears, muscle spasms or contracture. During ART treatment, the patient actively moves the affected muscle or ligament, while the physical therapist presses or maintains contact on the injured area. The physical therapist can then feel the structure as it moves and effectively treat the specific muscles, tendons or ligaments. ...


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Bone Mineral Density Test

A bone mineral density (BMD) test evaluates an individual's bone strength by measuring the density of calcium and other minerals in particular areas of bone. During normal aging, bones lose minerals and become thinner. If they become abnormally thin, however, the patient has a condition known as osteoporosis. ...


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Intradiscal Electrothermal Therapy

Intradiscal electrothermal therapy (IDET) is a minimally invasive procedure for treating lower-back pain caused by worn spinal discs. IDET uses a heating device on the affected disc; the heat that it generates destroys nerve fibers, toughens the disc's tissue, and repairs small tears. IDET is usually performed only after discography or other diagnostic testing indicates that a patient may benefit from it. ...


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Gait Analysis

Gait analysis, also known as walking or motion analysis, is a comprehensive evaluation of the way an individual stands and walks. The purpose of gait analysis is to detect any abnormalities in locomotion. An individual's gait is a combination of complex functions involving use of the body's visual, somatosensory and vestibular systems. Problems within any of these systems, as well as problems in the joints involved, can lead to postural and gait abnormalities. Gait analysis, as a noninvasive method of detection, is of great value in identifying certain medical conditions, determining whether further testing is required, and illuminating possible treatment options. ...


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Rehabilitation for Rotator Cuff Injury

The rotator cuff is the thick band of muscles and associated tendons that cover the top of the upper arm and hold in it place, providing support and stability to the shoulder joint. The rotator cuff allows the arm full range of motion, while keeping the ball of the arm bone in the shoulder socket. The tendons of the rotator cuff can be injured or torn, usually from overuse over a long period of time, but also from trauma. Rotator cuff injuries typically affect people older than 40, and athletes or others who engage in repetitive lifting or overhead activities. ...


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Rehabilitation for a Torn Meniscus

A torn meniscus is a common knee injury, and typically the result of forcefully rotating the knee while it is bearing weight. The meniscus, a piece of cartilage that functions as a shock absorber, can also tear as a result of the degenerative changes that occur during aging. In many cases, a torn meniscus goes undetected; in some, however, they cause intense pain. Although arthroscopic surgery is sometimes necessary to repair a tear, in many cases physical therapy is all that is needed. If arthroscopic surgery is necessary, postsurgical physical therapy is required. ...


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Rehabilitation for Spinal Conditions

Rehabilitation for spinal problems may be prescribed before or after spinal surgery, or in the hope that it will make surgery unnecessary. Whenever it is prescribed, rehabilitation for the back is designed to reduce inflammation, alleviate pain, and restore strength and mobility. Sometimes, treatment also attempts to realign mild anatomical deformities that may be the result of congenital defects, diseases or injuries. Physical rehabilitation for spinal problems includes ice, heat, hydrotherapy, massage, electrical stimulation and ultrasound, in addition to physical exercises specifically tailored to strengthen the spine. ...


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Rehabilitation for Lateral Epicondylitis

Lateral epicondylitis, also known as tennis elbow, is an elbow injury caused by overuse of the muscles and tendons of the forearm and elbow. The pain associated with this condition affects the lateral epicondyle, the area where the tendons of the forearm connect with the bony outer portion of the elbow. Repetitive movement and constant use during certain types of activities can put excessive strain on the elbow tendons. Although tennis elbow can occur in tennis players, and those who participate in certain athletic activities, it can also occur in people who have jobs that involve repetitive motions of the wrist and arm, such as carpenters, or people in construction-related trades. ...


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Rehabilitation for Bursitis

Bursitis is the painful inflammation of a bursa, a sac between tissues that is filled with lubricating fluid. In many cases, the condition can be treated at home by resting, applying ice, and taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In more severe cases, rehabilitation is necessary. Generally speaking, bursitis pain that persists for a week or more should be evaluated by a physician. ...


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Rehabilitation for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), which runs diagonally through the middle of the knee, is one of the knee's most frequently injured ligaments. About half of all ACL injuries are accompanied by damage to the meniscus, cartilage, bone or other ligaments in the knee, complicating the healing process. After initial treatment of rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE), a patient with an ACL injury will require physical therapy. ...


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Rehabilitation for Whiplash

Whiplash is a common condition that occurs when a sudden backward-forward motion of the head causes muscles and ligaments in the neck to move beyond their normal range of motion. Whiplash injuries are frequently associated with vehicular accidents and contact sports. No single treatment has proven effective for all whiplash injuries, but there are many viable treatment options available. The first treatment for a whiplash injury is usually the application of ice for 24 hours. After that, passive treatments, which are administered by physicians or other medical professionals, and do not require patient participation, are typically used. Passive therapy is designed not only to relieve pain and improve mobility, but to help patients heal enough so that they can engage in the active exercises that will lead to full rehabilitation. ...


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Rehabilitation for Amputees

Amputation is the removal of a limb or extremity: arm, leg, hand, foot, finger or toe. Amputation is a treatment of last resort, performed only after all other forms of treatment have failed. It is used to treat severe infection, disease progression, removal of a tumor on a bone or muscle, or persistent pain. Before undergoing an amputation, a thorough physical examination is performed to verify that amputation is the only feasible option. The most common type of amputation is removal, either above or below the knee, of the leg. ...


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Rehabilitation After Knee Arthroplasty

Physical therapy begins very soon after knee arthroplasty (replacement) is complete, and usually lasts for about 6 weeks. Patients are given analgesics to relieve postoperative pain sufficiently so that they can begin knee exercises as soon as possible. At first, they are encouraged to sit up and perform knee slides. Within days, or even hours, they are instructed to perform other exercises in order to regain muscle strength and flexibility. In addition, many patients are taught to use continuous passive motion devices. ...


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Rehabilitation After Hip Arthroplasty

Hip arthroplasty involves replacing part of the femur bone or hip socket with prosthetic devices. After surgery, a physical therapy program is created to help the patient regain flexibility, increase range of motion, and strengthen the hip and leg. The goal of physical therapy is to help patients to walk safely, without assistance, and eventually return them to all of their regular activities. ...


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Physical Therapy for Shoulder Conditions

After initial treatment for a shoulder condition, rehabilitation in the form of physical therapy is often necessary to restore full strength and range of motion to the shoulder, and help the patient return to all usual activities. The physical therapy regimen is designed to strengthen muscles and increase mobility. In some cases, physical therapy alone is used to treat a shoulder condition. ...


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Physical Therapy for Ankle Conditions

Certain conditions affect the ankle joint, causing stiffness and pain, and difficulty with walking. People with chronic ankle problems caused by issues such as ankle impingement or chronic ankle instability, or conditions such as osteoarthritis, often undergo rehabilitation to strengthen the ankle and increase its flexibility, and/or relearn how walk properly. ...


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Physical Therapy for Knee Pain

Knee pain is often the result of injury, a mechanical issue or arthritis. One injury that causes knee pain is a tear in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL); a mechanical issue that causes knee pain is a dislocated knee cap. There are many types of arthritis that cause knee pain; two of the most common are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Treating knee pain with physical therapy can minimize or eliminate pain, and restore movement. ...


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Physical Therapy for Fibromyalgia

Physical therapy is often recommended as a treatment for fibromyalgia, which is a chronic condition that causes fatigue, and widespread pain and tenderness in the muscles, ligaments and tendons. People who suffer from fibromyalgia often have tender places on their bodies that are particularly sensitive when pressure is applied. Fibromyalgia can also cause constant dull muscle aches throughout the body, including in the upper chest, inner knees or upper shoulders. Certain physical therapy techniques and exercises can help with fibromyalgia. ...


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Rehabilitation After Shoulder Surgery

Shoulder surgery is performed for any number of reasons, including repairing a torn rotator cuff, correcting shoulder instability, or repositioning a dislocated shoulder. After surgery, the shoulder is susceptible to reinjury, so it is important to closely follow rehabilitation guidelines to ensure proper healing and regain full range of motion. To help restore the shoulder's full function, physical therapy is an essential part of rehabilitation. ...


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